Battle History



                                                                                              

                                      BRISTOE STATION, VA.
                                        OCT. 14TH, 1863

                     Bristoe Station, Va, Oct. 14, 1863.  2nd Army Corps.  On
                this date the corps was under the temporary command of Brig.-
                Gen. John C. Caldwell, Gen. Warren being absent.  After the
                engagement at Catlett's station in the morning, the command
                pushed forward to Bristoe the object being to get possession
                of the Orange & Alexandria railroad, the line of which
                afforded a strong position for defense.  As the advance
                approached the station Caldwell learned that the Confederates
                were advancing in line of battle to attack his flank.  He
                gained the railroad and formed his line of battle with his own
                division (the 1st) on the left, Webb's (2nd) division on the
                right, and Hays' (3rd) division in the center the batteries
                being planted in the rear in such a position that they could
                fire over the heads of the infantry.  Against this line Gen.
                A. P. Hill sent Cooke's North Carolina brigade without taking
                the customary precaution to advance a skirmish line to develop
                the Federal position.  As Cooke advanced he was met by a
                withering fire of musketry, while the batteries in the rear
                poured a rapid fire of canister into his line, causing it to
                break in disorder, leaving 5 pieces of artillery and 2 stands
                of colors in Union hands.  The loss of the 2nd corps for the
                day, including the actions at Auburn and Catlett's station,
                was 50 killed, 335 wounded and 161 missing.  A Confederate
                account says that their loss was 1,400 in killed and wounded.
                This decisive repulse checked Lee's advance and enabled the
                Army of the Potomac to take a strong position at Centerville.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 5 -----------------------------------------------------------------

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